Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Panikeke Lapotopoto - Round Pancakes

By panipopos

Samoans make two kinds of pancakes - flat round ones and round round ones. Both recipes are so simple that they are unwritten and measured by the eye. Both use ingredients that are probably already in your pantry, and both can be mixed and ready to eat within half an hour.


My favourite are the panikeke lapotopoto - the round round ones - which commonly come in two flavours: plain and banana. Though I've also had them with pineapple and even raisins too.

Now, you shouldn't think that panikeke are exclusively Samoan, because Tongans make them, as well as Fijians. Heck, even the Okinawans have something similar.

Interestingly, some people squeeze the dough out from their fists, a sort of human pastry bag, if you will. They claim that the fried product is rounder and better shaped than those that enter the frier via spoon.

I reckon it's just a clever way to make sure the cook doesn't pop every third panikeke into their mouth. Think about it. If one hand is squeezing the dough in, and the other hand is taking the cooked panikeke out (with a utensil, obviously), then there are no idle hands to stuff your face with.



So the following recipe makes a baker's dozen, that's 13 pieces. But don't count how many are in the photo ok? Because it's the cook's right, even their duty, to eat a panikeke or two. How else will we know if the oil is hot enough?

Panikeke (makes 12, shhh)
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup sugar
pinch of salt
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
water
oil for frying

Heat up your oil over medium heat, then as soon as it starts to get shimmery, turn the heat down low. If you have anything as fancy as a thermometre in your kitchen, heat the oil to somewhere between 320°F and 356°F (160°C to 180°C).

You don't have to wait for your oil to get to temperature before mixing your batter. It'll take you less than five minutes, so go ahead and sift the flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Add the egg and milk, then mix everything up with enough water to form a thick batter. You know, I want to call this a batter because we're making pancakes, but it's actually more like a wet dough. See the video if you're not sure what consistency it should be.



Fry tablespoonfuls in the oil for 3-5 minutes until they're dark golden brown. If your oil is too high, the panikeke will be uncooked on the inside. If your oil is too low you'll have greasy panikeke. So every couple of batches, break one open to make sure it's cooked through, and eat it if you really must.

Eat hot or cold, though these usually don't get a chance to cool down before they're snatched up.


* You can substitute self-raising flour for the flour and baking powder.

* This recipe can be, and probably should be, doubled, tripled, quadrupled. Just make sure you don’t add too much liquid.

* Add a dash of vanilla to the mix if you like.

* Feel free to squeeze the panikeke from your hands, but two spoons work just as well. If you mixed a good dough, and the oil is the right temperature, then the panikeke will round themselves out, no matter what shape you drop in the oil. And if your panikeke have little 'horns' on them, well man, grab those horns! They´re crunchy and delicious!

http://panipopos.blogspot.com/

94 comments:

  1. Oh, these are divine! I have missed them, and I am so excited to try making them myself. Thank you for sharing all your delicious recipes with us!

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  2. No worries Jenn. I enjoy making and eating everything on this blog.

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  3. i just made these not too long ago. my kids LOVE them and are so excited when their papa makes it for them:)i still have yet to get them perfectly round...i like to have my kids guess which animal each panikeke best represents:)

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  4. Glad to hear your feedback, thx!...don't know who decided that panikeke have to be round...they taste good whatever (animal) shape they are.

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  5. therisa@hotmail.comNovember 26, 2010 at 8:55 AM

    Thank you so much for the demo on Samoan Panikeke. Finally a great recipe to follow, no more guess work. I appreciate the background information on how the panikeke will naturally fill it's self out to become round.

    Keep up the great website, it's awesome heck, your awesome!!!

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  6. Awww...shucks...making me blush. Thx for the compliments.

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  7. I want to make banana flavored ones, but Im not sure how many bananas to add. I'm thinking 2??

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  8. For the quantity of batter up above, add 1 very ripe banana.

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  9. Awesome! Thank you for this awesome blog! My panikeke came out pretty good, but I know my next batch will be even better.

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  10. Just found your blog about a month ago and would just like to post my appreciation for it. This is the first recipe I tried and am still trying to master. Everything is great i just haven't gotten my thermometer for the oil temp. hehe! I am going to go through and do almost all your recipe's. My in-laws will enjoy it I know! Thank you kindly and please keep up the good work. BTW, are there any more of your recipe's anywhere else, just in case it's not on here? Ia Alofa Le Atua e fa'amanuia lou taleni! Jen ;)

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  11. Hi Jen! Thx for dropping by the blog and for trying my recipes...I'm always happy to hear if something works or doesn't work for you...I don't have recipes posted anywhere else except for this blog (videos are hosted by YouTube)...All the best with your cooking!

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  12. this blog is awesome! thank you for sharing such treasures. faafetai and now i'm off to make panikekes for dinner. hahaha

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  13. LOL...Matagi, you'd be surprised what I've eaten from this blog for dinner, and breakfast...I totally understand! Thx for dropping by!

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  14. Dear Pani (hehehe)
    As a New Zealand born Samoan, I would like to thank you for enabling me to eat all the yummy foods of my childhood by cooking them myself. Was very good at eating everything as a child but was lax in taking note at how to make the yummy dishes. I've mastered chop suey (thanks Dad and Mum), getting better at my Faalifu Talo (thanks again mum and Dad), I make mean fresh Luau (thank you Daddy hehehe) but when it came to desserts Mum and Dad passed down yummy family recipes for pavlova, sponge cake, banana cake, afghan slice... but sadly no samoan desserts :( But thanks to your blog, my big sis and I are whipping out batches of pani popo's and after this lil' video.. I'm about to take myself off to kitchen to whip up some yummy panikeke (which sadly we only ate when one of the women at church sold them at church games :D:D:D). So thank you once again for helping us reconnect with the food we love so much. Big alofa's to you girl and keep 'em coming :) xxx

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  15. So awesome to read your comment...gave me the warm fuzzies inside...I'm so happy that the blog helps more people make yummy Samoan desserts, because honestly, I don't think island food gets the recognition it deserves...Happy cooking!

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  16. How do you do the pineapple ones? I am also looking for a German bun recipe with the shredded coconut center that is deep fried. That seems like a heavily guarded secret. Thanks for putting up some great information & videos.

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  17. I'll try to make a recipe for pineapple and banana ones soon...Cheers!

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  18. Born and bred Samoan but not a clue on how to bake the buns for the panipopos which is how I stumbled across your blog and it's fantastic! Have a bandaged finger at the moment but the second it's off I'll be attempting the panipopos, keke pua'as and those panikeke lapotopoto - then I'll surprise all our Aiga Samoa in Dubai at the next To'ona'i heh heh You're doing such a fab job. Thank you!! :-)

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  19. Thanks a lot for the comment! Dubai huh? Exotic location! Everyone makes the buns a little different but this recipe works for me and my family...Hope it also works for yours...Happy baking!

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  20. Thank you sooo much for the recipe. I just made a batch for my family and they lurved it. The next time though I wont over mix the dough as much for it was a little bit tough:) I also added vanilla essence which gave it a nice smell and flavour. Being a NZ born Samoan, I love re-creating the food my mum use to make thanks to the help of your accurate recipes and demonstrations. Keep up the awesome work (brilliant idea) look forward to more of your recipes on this site. Faafetai Lava xo

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  21. Vanilla essence is a great idea, and I love it when I hear about variations to the stuff I make...Anyway, I'm really happy my blog is useful to someone, and I haven't been doing all this work for nothing. All the best with your cooking!

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  22. finally thank for this recipe i finally gonna make it myself cause i always buy it all the time and i dont had to spent money to buy the panikekes everythings are to expensive i save that money for something else and what ever shape my panikeke turn up i dont care cause i love panikeke :-)

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  23. It's my pleasure to share what I know...Sometimes it's easier to buy panikeke if you only want to eat one or two, but if you want enough for your family after dinner, then definitely make them at home...good luck!

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  24. Thanks for your recipe! I tried this last night and it worked out really well : ) The whole family enjoyed them and my parents were so impressed they said I should set up a panikeke stall at the market LOL... Well, that has to be the ultimate compliment from them. I would like to try some with banana and/or pineapple - look forward to your next recipe for panikeke and thanks for this blog.

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  25. Hi Studymum, thanks for trying out the recipe...I want to make a recipe for the banana and pineapple ones but haven't had the chance yet...Maybe in a month or two...Thank you for the feedback, much appreciated!

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  26. These are a hit with my afakasi kids! Thank you! Mmmmmm.

    from San Diego,CA

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  27. hello my names amanda n my mum is A LEGEND at making these wen ever theres a church meetn mothers meeting bingo games wat ever get together it may b she is always asked to bring her pankekes as for me well i never knew how to make them and now that mums overseas i miss them big time so i stumbbled across ur blog n O.M.G i tried ur recipe jus so happens the famz were all over n being sunday after church toanai well yea it was a huge success n its thanks to u they were the best i have to say they were as gud as mums ones n every1 loved it the vanilla smell n flavour jus made it splendid but much appreciated

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  28. Hi Amanda, thank you very much for your comment...I'm sure you did your mum proud by making panikeke and getting them right the first time...You're a legend in the making!

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  29. Thank you very much. I tried cooking these for my in-laws that came from samoa and it did not come out well. Mine look like little animals!! So I gave up on making them, but after seeing your easy instructions and the actual temp your oil should be it makes me want to try it out now!! Super excited and wish me luck. Thanks so much for your easy and help instructions. Much alofas and keep up the great work!!

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  30. Good luck and please don't give up...Even if they're funny shapes they probably still taste good!

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  31. Thank you! This is me again about my animal looking panikeke. Lol. I forgot to post my name from June 25th, but guess what? I tried it and I did it!! They don't look as perfect as yours, but after the 7th or the 8th one they were roundish, nice brown colored and not greasy! It was so good! My little one loves it when his grandma makes them and now his mother can too!! Thanks for wishing me luck and God Bless on keeping the Samoan food tradition alive!

    Much alofas,
    Grace

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  32. WOW Grace! Thanks for the feedback...I hope your little one likes them so much he continues the tradition started by your mother...Just remember though, as my mother used to say, if you eat too many panikeke, you start to look like one...(and I looked like one all through my childhood...lol)...All the best!

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  33. THANK YOU FOR SHARING THIS! I haven't had this in years and it was sooo easy to make. Now I don't have to bug my parents to make it for me anymore, lol! Thank you thank you!!

    Cheers!

    Jaybird

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  34. Hi Jaybird, thanks for trying out the recipe. Just act like you don't know how to make them or you'll be taking over as the family fryer. Malo!

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  35. OMG!!! Thank you for another wonderful recipe!!! Diet has just been thrown out!! Your recipes are too good to pass up!!! Thank you again! Totally Awesome. I am going to try out every recipe that you have!! Vinaka

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  36. Hey Fijigirl, good luck with these...They're a favourite across the islands!

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  37. Love this recipe!!! My sister followed this recipe and its the bomb.com!!! Thanks for your blog!

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  38. Awesome stuff! Glad you like it.

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  39. Ms. Panipopos,

    Tell me how to make them so nice and round. I don't have that much oil to fill a big humongous pot. So what happens is I have to let them float on one side and turn them and they are kind of odd shaped like hair balls (but still delicious).

    I was thinking of making a special panikeke pot. It would be about the size of a coffee can.
    You know. Narrow and deep so I don't have to use so much oil.

    your faithful student,

    _justin from California

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  40. Hi Justin, you just reminded me of our panikeke oil pot....I remember that it was a permanent fixture in our house, a heavy pot kept in a cool, dark cupboard and only brought out for panikeke frying...Actually it was filled with lard, not oil, and we used it numerous times until it got dark and dirty...sounds gross, but the panikeke it produced were always tasty...If you eat panikeke a lot, by all means make a special pot, but if you don't deep fry that often (I don't) just buy the oil you need for that batch, strain it once cooled, then recycle it for your regular cooking. Good luck!

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  41. It brings me to tears to finally know how to cook the Samoan food from childhood. We were raised up on restaurant & Mcdonalds. Our mom would always take us to other families house to eat samoan food and we were never taught because the kids were kicked out until we had to serve the food. I am sooo greatful & proud to be able to share our cultural foods with my own family. Thank You & may God continue to Bless your efforts. - San Bernardino, Ca.

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  42. Hello, and thank you. I'm really happy you discovered the blog, and even happier that you are willing to make Samoan food...The more people that can make it, the better. Please teach any young people in your family how to enjoy and appreciate our wonderful traditional food because it's more nutritious, fulfilling and meaningful than any fast food (except Pinati's! lol). Fa'afetai!

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  43. thank you so much for sharing....oh i been missing all these food...and Thank God for your blog now I can make it myself instead of missing it....you have all my favorite food and I am glad now I can try and make my own....thank you so much....do you happen to know how to make german bun...dat I miss a lot back home....okay thank you again n again...

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  44. Thx for the comment...really happy you found the blog...hardest thing about Samoan food is just finding the ingredients...the rest is a piece of cake...Happy cooking!

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  45. I loved this as a child! My grandma (who has passed on) used to make keke w/ hot chocolate. I'm excited to make it for my family, they will be pleasantly surprised.

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  46. Hope they come out just as you remember them. Good luck!

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  47. Love your site. I've been asking family and friends for years for the recipe and no one wants to share it. Why? I don't know. It shouldn't be a secret. Thank you so much for sharing recipes on your blog that reminds me of the great legacy of many families for many many generations. Your a blessing to many of us, who miss the traditions of great family cooking from Samoa. Now it can be passed on to my children & so on. Fa'afetai lava! God bless! ~Tri-lingual Family/1st generation

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  48. Hi, in Samoan culture, 'knowledge' has always been precious...I just decided to blog what I know so that the future generations, some of who are becoming more and more distant from the Samoan culture, have a reference they can use to recreate traditional food. If your family finds my blog useful, then my aim has been achieved. Thank you for visiting Panipopos' Kitchen!

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  49. is any body able to give me a donut recipe...i miss the donuts..

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  50. I am trying to find the video where is it

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  51. Fa'afetai lava for making this blog and passing on your knowledge! I can't wait to try this out!

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  52. No problem Tiffany. I hope they work out for you!

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  53. These panikekes were off the hook, I was told after tea by the kids that they had a cultural shared lunch the next day...I checked the pantry and only had what was needed to make these panikekes, so I thought I'd give it a crack...they turned out great and tasted beautiful. My daughters told me the panikekes went quick lol. Thanks panipopo!!! Now, just have to get the courage to make some panipopos lol

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    1. Thanks for making these and for the feedback. Happy you all liked them. Don't be afraid of the pagi popo. The recipe is simple and there's also a video to help you along. Good luck!

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  54. Im so excited about your blog!! I made these panikekes tonight and they came out just like i remembered it except my shapes were ugly. lol. But thank you for making this blog. One thing i regret the most is not learning all of this before my parents passed away when i was 14 and now im married and would love to share these recipes with my husband who is an "atunuu". Thank you!!!!

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  55. your fantastic and I LOVE YOU!!! thank you so much!

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  56. thankyou heaps for the panikeke recipe.....now my boys and I can enjoy making and eating them....only time we got our hands on any was from a local Sa shop for 50c ea....also love the blog and the work you put into it....take care and will defs follow this blog for other recipes xo

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    1. Thanks Anonymous (x3) for your comments. Glad you enjoy the recipes!

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  57. I was trying to make them the other day like the way my mother does and so for confidence I called her in NZ and she was surprised that I didn't know how to make panikeke haha I tried it and because my boys and hubby were wondering what all the spikes were for, I decided that was my first and last attempt haha. From reading your blog, I may try again soon. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Don't give up! The spikes taste good despite how they look. Hope to hear in the future that you've had success with these.

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  58. i'm an afakasi living on the US mainland away from all my Samoan dad's aiga, so i missed out on a lot of the food and whatnot because my dad wasn't much of a cook. now that it's just the two of us and money's tight, i know he's so homesick for the islands and your blog has taught me so much of the cooking all my Samoan aunties never got the chance to.
    i made panikeke this morning on a whim. Dad grabbed one with his coffee and disappeared. five minutes later he came back grinning like a little boy and grabbed 3 more. "These are as good as home!", he said.
    thank you so much for putting a smile on the face of a man who misses his home and his aiga so much. your blog means more to me than you could ever know.
    now i'm trying not to cry into the rest of the batter :).

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    1. Hello Moana, loved your story! I was smiling just thinking about how happy your Dad was at having a favourite childhood food..."grinning like a little boy" LOL. Thank you for visiting my blog and if you need any one-to-one help, feel free to email me. And hey, try not to cry into your food, adds too much salt :).

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  59. Thanks for posting up all your recipes, I tried making some of them, and they were absolutely delicious, From kekepuaa to this recipe, oh so umm umm good. I never thought i could cook, til i tried your recipes...but you still are the best :) God bless
    PS. Kekepuaas are delicious i sold some i made for $2 each lol

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    1. Thanks for leaving your wonderful comment. Happy your kekepua'a sold - you've made more money than I ever have from my recipes LOL.

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  60. Just found what I'm been looking for Samoan food recipes...masi,paifala n panikeke lapotopoto I gotta try it..Thank you!!!!

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  61. Fa'amolemole a panipopos.my mum needs Samoa101 on pani popo.her pani popos are more like pani ma'a! She ALWAYS goes off this Samoan cook book made by the Samoan womens organisation or something and they don't explain everything needed to know.

    Manuia

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    1. I know the cookbook. I have it, and there's something desperately wrong with the recipe in there. If its any consolation, my mother complains that my pagi don't taste like pagi Samoa...so maybe some people prefer the ma'a. Make your mother a batch of my recipe and see what she thinks.

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  62. can i make it without the baking powder?

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    1. If you substitute the flour for self-raising flour, then yes, you can. Or if you substitute the baking powder for yeast, but that's a whole other recipe.

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  63. Greetings!
    I'm actually making these right now as we speak lol. My cousin asked me to make some for tonight's Superbowl party. I was freaking out 'cause I hadn't made these since my grandmother first taught me as a kid years back. So here I am through the grace of Google search, and let me tell you: You are a lifesaver!!! I just barely got the first batch out, and everyone here is loving 'em! Thank you again for this amazing blog. I wish you all the best. Kk, gotta get back to cooking the next batch.
    Malo 'aupito and 'ofa 'atu from America.

    Josh.

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    1. Hi Josh, Thanks so much for the comment! You need to lock the kitchen when you are making these or else they disappear faster than you can make them and all you're left with is the smell. Have an awesome Superbowl party and malo 'aupito for taking the time to write. All the best!

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  64. This is a really nice recipe I never had before,I tried most of recipe bt this is the perfect,thank you so much for sharing this recipe,apricated

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    1. no problem, thank you for your feedback

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  65. This is a really nice recipe,I never had before,I tried most of recipe from my frens bt this is the perfect one,thank you so much for sharing this,apriciated,,1st time I tried this morning and it was really good,thanks again

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    1. I appreciate how you really tried to get your comment through...sorry blogger played around with it...and thanks so much!

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  66. Thank you for sharing this recipe,I like it n it's better than other recipe I tried before,may God Bless

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  67. I was wondering what using bisquick is ok? I doubt it but i have to ask. I habent had thaes since i was a kid!

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  68. I used this recipe lots of time,my husband is a white man and he loves this recipe,and I do too,but only one problem my pancake is not really round like you have,I don't know why,but I uses the tablespoon,eniwaiz thanks again pagipopo for sharing all your recipes it's so nice of you

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  69. In Saipan, we call it Boñuelos Okinawa :)

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  70. i craved pagikeke lastweek Sunday and texted my aunt in hawaii for the recipe... evening fall and still no reply. i bet myself panipopos got it on her blog.. and yuss i was right ;*)... thanks panipopos for my panikekes.. love 'em!

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  71. Thank you so much for this recipe!!! I am still trying to get them to be as round as yours! They look SO pretty! HAHA! Is there something i'm doing wrong when they don't go perfectly round? Did I add too much water? Thanks again for your amazing blog!!!!

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  72. Thank you SO much for this recipe! I've made them twice now and have yet to get them as round as yours! Yours just look so pretty! HAHA! I was wondering if there is something I'm doing wrong? Do you think it's because I may have added a tad too much water and that's the reason they don't end up round? Anyway, they still taste good but, it's the OCD in me! LOL! I want them to be round, dangit! Haha!

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  73. Hey sis, do I have to wait till the mix rises or no need???

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  74. Hello,

    Thank you so much for this recipe.. These are made in Ghasna West Africa and Ive been looking for the recipe. Yours look puuuuurfect..exactly as I remember them..Can you please give the estimate water to add? I look forward to your answer!!!

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  75. Seki lava pagikeke samoa .. ia sei faakaikai. . Faafekai lava le sharing is caring. .

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  76. Oh my thank you .my dear Im am sooo happy you are a legend one thing though what oil do you use is veg oil ok... I did read the comment on the old pot that was only used for panikeke .. Yes my mama had one of those pots and Yes it tasted sooo goood... much aroa...<3.

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  77. Hi Panipopo, can you please make videos of all your recipes...I'm a visual kind of cook haha I can watch it and get it and never forget it but to read the recipe, I just can't wrap my mind around it when I read the instructions, must be the coconut in me haha

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  78. These are really good and remind me of andagi (Okinawan donuts). My grandma used to squeeze the dough through her fingers, but I use a small ice cream scooper since I didn't inherit her talent.

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  79. My kids and I love these they can't get enough of them.

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  80. Interestingly this recipe is very similar to andagi (Okinawan donuts). Even the method of making the balls.
    http://www.hawaii.edu/recipes/dessert/okidonuts.html

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